Upcycling pillowcases into a bag for the bag

As I mentioned yesterday, our little girl is about to embark on a camping trip with her class. One of the requirements is she needs to be able to roll up her sleeping bag and put it in a carrying sack all on her own. Well, the one we have came in a bag three times too small for it (I have no idea why they do that), so I decided to make her a much bigger bag for the bag, upcycling  pillowcases.

Sleeping Bag Carrying Sack made from upcycling pillowcases

I first cut the bottom off a pillowcase and made it into a cycinder. Then, I took a second pillowcase and cut a large circle for the bottom. I don’t use math here (even though I probably should), but instead, cut it super large, and trimmed off what I didn’t need after it was sewn to the cylinder.

Sleeping Bag Carrying Sack made from upcycling pillowcases

I used the second pillowcase to create a simple strap.

Sleeping Bag Carrying Sack made from upcycling pillowcases

I sewed a casing for the drawstring at the top.

Sleeping Bag Carrying Sack made from upcycling pillowcases

Super simple and super quick to make. And after the pants, I needed something satisfying to whip up quickly. I made this in less than an hour from start to finish. There is plenty of room to also stuff her pillow. Which, incidentally is a throw pillow from our couch (she wanted a smaller pillow to take), that I also made a simple pillowcase for right after I made this (photos for another day).

On another note, if you have signed up to recieve our newsletters, you should have one in your inbox right now! If you haven’t, and you would like to sign up, look on the right hand side of this page, and you should see a spot to do so.

So tell me, what have YOU made today?

Easy Kid Recycling Project

Today I have a fun and super practical craft for you, and the best part? All you need is two things for this easy kid recycling project.

Easy Kid Recycling Project

We buy bandages that come in these oval shaped containers, and not all places recycle #5 plastics yet, so I have been hoarding keeping them until I came up with a project. The Care To Recycle® program has spurred me to get them out and make something with my kids. We decorated the containers, and then came up with many practical uses for them. For me, that is key to keeping something around. It has to have a place or purpose!

To decorate your own, you will need:

Easy Kid Recycling Project

A Band-Aid container and washi tape. Scissors are optional (the washi tape rips fairly easily).

Easy Kid Recycling Project

Start with ripping (or cutting) strips of tape and laying them across the middle of the container lid.

Easy Kid Recycling Project

Since our tape was pretty transparent, we did a few layers. That’s it! The great thing about using the tape, is that it is removable. My initial thought was to decoupage them (as I am known to do), which works, but it doesn’t come off so easily if you would like to change it up, or even recycle the container (if you find somewhere that does take them). With this tape, you can change the design as many times as you want, and even take it off completely when you are done with it.

Easy Kid Recycling Project

Now for the fun part. Filling it!!

Easy Kid Recycling Project

My daughter’s dolls had a lot of fun in these portable doll beds!

Easy Kid Recycling Project

You can also make an emergency kit for someone going off to college, or a new driver!

Easy Kid Recycling Project

Of course, you can also make a box decorating kit for someone else to make.

Easy Kid Recycling Project

Some other ideas we had:

  • medical kit
  • portable sewing kit
  • treasure box
  • jewelry box
  • gift box
  • notions organizer
  • party favor box
  • hair tie/ ribbon holder
  • pencil box
  • Mother’s Day gift box
  • car activity box
  • miniature doll house
  • toy bathtub
  • glasses case
  • toiletry holder for traveling
  • bank/ money box

Easy Kid Recycling Project

Here are some tidbits of info for you provided by Johnson & Johnson Family of Consumer Companies :

 Parents are an emerging bright spot when it comes to extending in-home recycling habits to the bathroom.

  • A 2016 consumer survey on in-home recycling habits, conducted in partnership with Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc., shows that 60% of parents would be more likely to discuss recycling with their children if it was an activity they could do together and they had more creative, engaging ways to explain the impact of recycling.
  • The study also revealed that:
    • One-third of regular recyclers (34%) admit that it never even occurred to them to recycle in the bathroom!
    • The largest obstacle when it comes to recycling personal care products in the bathroom is a lack of tools and resources; only one in five recyclers have a recycling bin in their bathroom.

 Care To Recycle® seeks to break down barriers commonly associated with recycling in the bathroom by showing that recycling in the bathroom can be easy and fun!

  • Everything from shampoo and mouthwash bottles to soap and bandage boxes can be recycled. To better understand which bathroom products can and cannot be recycled, visit www.caretorecycle.com.
  • The more you know about what’s recyclable, the more likely you are to do it. For tips and tools to become a better recycler, visit www.caretorecycle.com.

Easy Kid Recycling Project

 

I was selected for this opportunity as a member of Clever Girls and the content and opinions expressed here are all my own.

Trashion Show Highlights

Trashion Show Recap

The Trashion Show was yesterday. It was the perfect end to our busy Spring Break! I submitted 4 outfits total. You can see each here, here, here, here, and just the jacket from here. I didn’t get too many photos of the actual show (I was busy running around, and it was dimly lit). But I did snap a few pf my girls outside. Trashion Show Recap

The Bee wore this for the “trashion” category. I made her jewelry out of foam shelf liner that I painted bronze, and fastened on her with safety pins.

Trashion Show Recap

I also had her wear these feathers in her hair.

Trashion Show Recap

She looked like she was straight out of Mad Max, and loved every minute.

Trashion Show Recap

My Falafel actually wore something made by a friend of mine, and I made an outfit for her daughter, since that jacket doesn’t fit my Falafel anymore.

Trashion Show Recap

That is the face she made the entire time she was walking the runway.

Trashion Show Recap

I also took photos of this magnificent creation (which won the grand prize) made by Sue VanDuine. There were over 1000 magazine pages used to make this.

Trashion Show Recap

Trashion Show Recap

Trashion Show Recap

One of the best parts of being in this trashion show was meeting new people. I was so inspired by their creative use of recycled materials. I think we can all learn something about reusing things we normally would throw away.

Trashion Show Recap

On another note, both my girls did a fantastic job modeling their outfits. I am so proud.

 What have YOU reused today?

Kid-friendly Cosplay Wonder Woman

Today I am sharing the kid-friendly Wonder Woman cosplay costume I made for my youngest:

Kid-friendly Wonder Woman Cosplay costume

See inspiration pin here

When I say “kid-friendly”, I mean age appropriate. No boobs or butts here. And I don’t think the costume is any lesser for it!

Kid-friendly Wonder Woman Cosplay costume

I will start by saying that my Falafel takes this role very seriously, and told me that Wonder Woman “does not smile”. So with the exception of this photo above, really she is a stern-faced super hero.

Kid-friendly Wonder Woman Cosplay costume

OK let’s get down to the details. For the shirt, I used the same one I made for her Astrid costume (which was made using Sew Much Ado’s Skipper Top), only for this one, I cut off the sleeves. I also took some gold vinyl and cut out an eagle and zig zag stitched it on.

Kid-friendly Wonder Woman Cosplay costume

For the skirt, I cut up some of my husband’s old jeans. I started with Momma Quail Patterns Abilene Skirt (like the one I made here) only I stopped at the crotch. I cut the yoke part into a “v” and then sewed piping around. I made it with a flat front and an elastic back. I made sure to top stitch any pieces I had to join together, so they look like jeans.

Kid-friendly Wonder Woman Cosplay costume

Then I made those arrow panels to mimic the ones found on a gladiator skirt (I believe they are called lappets- Thank you Craftingcon FB group!). They are lined with navy cotton fabric. I top stitched with denim thread (that gold stuff) and then sewed each one onto the skirt yoke, individually. I painted the white stars, freehand.

Kid-friendly Wonder Woman Cosplay costume

I love that the denim panels ended up being different colors (because they were from different pairs of jeans, after all).

Kid-friendly Wonder Woman Cosplay costume

Her golden lasso of truth, was not forged by the gods, but instead began as a humble braided curtain tieback that I unwound. I then used simple twist ties to hold the strands together. I created a loop to hook on her belt (which was found at a thrift store, and I painted it gold) with a hook and loop closure.

Kid-friendly Wonder Woman Cosplay costume

Her headband and wristbands were self drafted, made from that gold vinyl, and all are adjustable with velcro closures.

Kid-friendly Wonder Woman Cosplay costume

I also made her a faux cape/shawl out of fleece because it has been slightly chilly here, and I just found out that it will be 80 degrees the day we go to Comiccon.

Kid-friendly Wonder Woman Cosplay costume

Oh well. One less thing to carry.

Kid-friendly Wonder Woman Cosplay costume

Needless to say, she loves it.

Kid-friendly Wonder Woman Cosplay costume

Oh this girl.

Kid-friendly Wonder Woman Cosplay costume

Kid-friendly Wonder Woman Cosplay costume

Looks like we are all ready for Comiccon. The real question is, are they ready for us?!

What Superhero would YOU be?

From Trash to Mjolnir: DIY Thor’s Hammer

If you recieve my newsletter, you know that we are preparing to go to Comicon this year. As you may have guessed, we are all wearing cosplay costumes. I am working on them right now. Can you guess what I am going as? I will give you a hint: From Trash to Mjolnir: Making Thor's Hammer Purse

Did you guess the god of thunder and lightning?

Today I am sharing how I made Thor’s Hammer from common items in your recycling bin. From Trash to Mjolnir.

From Trash to Mjolnir: Making Thor's Hammer Purse

It all started with a box. My husband brought me this small box he had from work, when I told him that I wanted to make a Mjolnir Purse! That man knows me.

From Trash to Mjolnir: Making Thor's Hammer Purse

If you want to make your own Hammer bag, you’ll need your own rectangle box with an attached lid, a hot glue gun, paint, styrofoam to-go container, toilet paper tubes (or a paper towel tube), strap, fabric, and strong glue (like E6000).

From Trash to Mjolnir: Making Thor's Hammer Purse

To get started, I hot glued designs around the edges of the box. Then took the toilet paper tubes and unwound them, then rewound them tightly into a handle. It would be easier with a paper towel tube, but we don’t ever buy them, so I was working with what I had.  I made small cuts around the bottom of the handle so that it could lay flat on the box.

From Trash to Mjolnir: Making Thor's Hammer Purse

Next,  I hot glued the handle to the top of the box. I covered where the tube meets the box with some hot glue. I also cut out two panels of the styrofoam, hot glued those on to the sides, and etched a design using a chopstick.

From Trash to Mjolnir: Making Thor's Hammer Purse

I painted the whole thing silver and added a little black for the shading.

From Trash to Mjolnir: Making Thor's Hammer Purse

I cut a strip of brown vinyl fabric that was in my stash, and hot glued it to the handle. The last thing I did was to make a strap out of that same vinyl fabric. I did sew it, but you could also use glue, if you want, or even an existing strap. E6000 was used to glue the strap on to the sides because they will need to be extra secure.

From Trash to Mjolnir: Making Thor's Hammer Purse

It opens and closes like a normal box.

From Trash to Mjolnir: Making Thor's Hammer Purse

And now I have my very own Mjolnir Purse!

From Trash to Mjolnir: Making Thor's Hammer Purse

The best thing is, I used up things I had to make it.

I think that makes me worthy.

*****

How about you? What have YOU made lately?

 

Paper Feather Tutorial

I was perusing pinterest the other day, and came across a photo of paper feathers. When I followed the link, it was a dead end. So I decided to whip my own up, and while I was at it, make a paper feather tutorial for you too!

paper feather tutorial

Paper Feather Tutorial

As always, let’s gather the materials. You don’t need very many for this.

  • pair of scissors
  • 2 old book pages (I keep some for crafting purposes) or other paper you would like to use
  • glue
  • pipe cleaner/chenille stem

paper feather tutorial

First, rip off a small strip of paper. This is to cover the stem. I brushed glue on the bottom of the pipe cleaner, but you could just squeeze some on too.

paper feather tutorial

Twist the paper on tightly. If it doesn’t reach all the way down, you could add a piece of paper, or just snip that end off.

paper feather tutorial

Lay your pipe cleaner on one paper, lining up the part you just covered with the edge of the paper. Spread glue all over the paper, and the pipe cleaner.

paper feather tutorial

Place the other piece of paper on top and press down, smoothing out any bubbles.

paper feather tutorial

I pinched the pipe cleaner, and then ran my finger down each side, making sure the paper was tight around it. Don’t worry about any pipe cleaner sticking out the top. You will trim it later.

paper feather tutorial

Let it dry.

paper feather tutorial

Once it is dry, you can draw the shape of a feather on, or just wing it (ha. get it? WIng it!).

paper feather tutorial

Cut it out.

paper feather tutorial

Take your scissors and make small angled cuts down to the stem. Repeat for other side.

paper feather tutorial

I then went over it again, at slightly a different angle, catching some of the pieces.

paper feather tutorial

That is it! Becuase the pipe cleaner is in there, you can bend them any way you want.

paper feather tutorial

Or keep them straight.

paper feather tutorial

I think they look great in a vase, but would also be perfect for hats and recycled apparel.

paper feather tutorial

What would you use these for?

Recycled Mermaid Dress

Remember that Trashion show I keep mentioning (like here and here) and the tail I made for it? Well, I finally completed the last part of the mermaid outfit to go with that tail. Because after all, every mermaid needs a recycled mermaid dress, right?

Recycled mermaid dress using bubble wrap, produce netting, styrofoam wrap, and old sheets.

Recycled Mermaid Dress

Recycled mermaid dress using bubble wrap, produce netting, styrofoam wrap, and old sheets.

I had my daughter model it, even though it is not for her, and not her size, just to give you an idea. But, she COULD NOT STOP POPPING THE BUBBLE WRAP. Broken finger and all.

Recycled mermaid dress using bubble wrap, produce netting, styrofoam wrap, and old sheets.

OK let me start with the pattern. I used the trusty Molly Peasant dress by Sis Boom. I used that same pattern to make a Belle inspired dress as well as a Regency Style Jane Austen inspired dress.

Recycled mermaid dress using bubble wrap, produce netting, styrofoam wrap, and old sheets.

Now, on to those materials. I used a good deal of bubble wrap for the sleeves and the skirt. I also used the cushion wrap as an overlay, on top of an old bed sheet. This dress is a for an adorable little girl that uses a wheelchair, so I wanted the inside to be as comfortable for her as possible. The skirt also uses produce netting.

Recycled mermaid dress using bubble wrap, produce netting, styrofoam wrap, and old sheets.

That middle panel on the bodice was sewn the same way I made the collar on this dress, using scraps and water soluble stabilizer *affiliate link*.

Recycled mermaid dress using bubble wrap, produce netting, styrofoam wrap, and old sheets.

I tied more produce netting around the sleeves instead of adding elastic (like the pattern suggests).

Recycled mermaid dress using bubble wrap, produce netting, styrofoam wrap, and old sheets.

The one challenging aspect of working with plastic and bubble wrap was how the material was weakened at the seams. I had to reinforce it in a few places. Other than that, I just sewed it up like I would any other material.

Recycled mermaid dress using bubble wrap, produce netting, styrofoam wrap, and old sheets.

I had the chance to do a fitting with the lovely young lady that will be wearing this dress. I am super happy that it fits her perfectly!

Recycled mermaid dress using bubble wrap, produce netting, styrofoam wrap, and old sheets.

We are all ready for the Trashion show in April! It feels so good to cross something off my ever-growing to-do list.

Recycled Bag Mermaid Tail

I just finished this recycled bag mermaid tail which is one component of the last outfit I am making for the upcoming Trashion Show. If you recieve my newsletter, you will know that I had a special request for this outfit, and I am so excited to make it happen.

Recycled Bag Mermaid Tail! Who knew you could make something so cool out of trash?!

I went to a local feed store, and asked if they had any trash for me to use. And they did!

Recycled Bag Mermaid Tail! Who knew you could make something so cool out of trash?!

They had these strange plastic woven bags (that frayed like crazy). I have no idea what they were used for, and honestly, I don’t think I want to know. I do know that I took them apart and made a mermaid tail with them.

Recycled Bag Mermaid Tail! Who knew you could make something so cool out of trash?!

I looked up images on Pinterest, and found my inpiration here. 

Recycled Bag Mermaid Tail! Who knew you could make something so cool out of trash?!

I sewed it together, then painted it with acrylics.

Recycled Bag Mermaid Tail! Who knew you could make something so cool out of trash?!

My little mermaid with her broken finger modeled it for me.

Recycled Bag Mermaid Tail! Who knew you could make something so cool out of trash?!

Recycled Bag Mermaid Tail! Who knew you could make something so cool out of trash?!

Look at that space! Her palate expander is working already! You know, because Mermaids have those.

Recycled Bag Mermaid Tail! Who knew you could make something so cool out of trash?!

I am still working on the dress part, and will share it when I am done. But for now, I am super happy about making a pretty tail out of trash.

Tell me, what have YOU made today?

Making a recycled materials corset

Remeber the Trashion show I am going to be in? I made another outfit for it, only this time it is for the “trash” category. That means it needs to be made from things that normally would be thrown away and are not traditional fabrics. For this challenge, I got to make my first recycled materials corset.

recycled materials corset using juice pouches, weed barrier cloth, and zip ties!

Would you have guessed I made this corset using juice pouches, weed barrier cloth, and zip ties?? Well, I did!

corsetclose2m

I used Butterick pattern 5935 Corset view A *affliliate link*. It walked me right through the process (in conjunction with the Basics of Corset Making book). And you know what? It wasn’t that difficult!

trashion5m

I discovered a few things while making this very unique garment for my teen. First is, juice pouches (especially when cut open and sewed together) rip easily. Which brings me to my second discovery: I should have followed the pattern that directed me to sew bias tape all around the border to connect the lining and outer layers. I veered from the pattern and stitched the coset and lining right sides together, so I had to turn the straps (which were very narrow and stiff). I ended up ripping one small spot that I stitched to repair on the left shoulder. I am thankful it wasn’t worse.

trashion3m

I did use bias tape on the bottom, and really like the effect.

trashionm

I am combining this with a skirt that I made out of packing foam. I am really excited about it!

corsetclosem

I’d say this is one of my favorite upcycles so far.

What have YOU upcycled today?

Signature Style: Project Run and Play Challenge

Well, it is the last challenge of Project Run and Play’s Season 11 and the theme is Signature Style.

I swear I think my signature style should be “where the heck did the time go, let me rush about last minute and fit it all in“. I actually came up with this idea a while ago, but the execution took longer than I remembered it would, so when I began Wednesday evening, I was stuck at “watching the glue dry” stage until Thursday afternoon. And then it was a rush against the sun setting so that I could actually photograph it and edit the photos before today.

I normally would have just let myself off the hook, especially after the week we’ve had (more about that in this week’s newsletter), but I really wanted to make this dress. So there’s that.

Signature Style for Project Run and Play. Glue Batik and sewing scraps with water soluble fabric.

Falafel and the Bee’s Signature Style

I began by asking myself, what is my signature style? The answer came in parts. The first being it had to be upcycled. I have been using tons of sheets lately,  I decided that would be a good place to start. If you know me, you know that I also love to paint on fabric. A lot.

Signature Style for Project Run and Play. Glue Batik and sewing scraps with water soluble fabric.

For this project, I did the batik method I used used years ago, (part one, part two, part three). I used Elmer’s blue school gel glue(*affiliate link*) on the white sheet to draw out a few feathers. Then I waited for it to dry. And I waited. And I waited. Finally on Thursday when it STILL wasn’t dry, I put it out into the sunshine which miraculously came out in a rare appearance. That did the trick.

Signature Style for Project Run and Play. Glue Batik and sewing scraps with water soluble fabric.

After it was finally dry, I watered down some acrylic paint, and painted over it. After THAT was dry, I rinsed the glue out. Then dried it again. I added some fine black lines with a sharpie, and then I could eventually cut out the pattern.

Signature Style for Project Run and Play. Glue Batik and sewing scraps with water soluble fabric.

For the pattern, I wanted a simple design so that I could show off some of the details of the fabric manipulation I did. I choose the Norah Dress by Mouse House Creations (*affiliate link*). Beautiful clean lined dress is just my style.

Signature Style for Project Run and Play. Glue Batik and sewing scraps with water soluble fabric.

For the collar, I tried a new (to me) technique. I found it on Pinterest and I followed the link to Just Jude’s tutorial. This was the first time I ever used water soluble fabric, and I have to tell you, this stuff is magic (*also affiliate link*)!

Signature Style for Project Run and Play. Glue Batik and sewing scraps with water soluble fabric.

I have been working on some other recycled/upcycled projects, simultaneously. Consequently, my scraps consisted of very strange materials, like weed barrier and juice pouches. Definitley adds some visual interest, doesn’t it?

Signature Style for Project Run and Play. Glue Batik and sewing scraps with water soluble fabric.

Since the scraps I used contained a little red, I thought a red button on the back would tie it together nicely.

Signature Style for Project Run and Play. Glue Batik and sewing scraps with water soluble fabric.

I do wish I had taken better photos, but I suppose I should be thankful they were taken at all! We just made it before the sun set. And my girl was such a good sport, even with a broken finger.

Whew.

OK to recap: My signature style is upcycled, simple, clean lines, fabric manipulation, with painting, trying new techniques…and sqeaking in before the deadline.

If you were to sum up YOUR signature style, what would it be?